Mongolian cooking recipes
 

   

We are happy to present you the recipes of some of the most famous dishes of the traditional mongolian cooking.

 

Horhog

Mantuun buuz

Guriltai shol 

Boodog

Bansh

Pyartan

Marmot boodog

Milk tea with bansh

Bantan

Hushuur

Boortsog

Suutei tsai

Buuz

Mongolian Barbecues

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an e-Mongol team preparing an Horhog during a tour


Mongolian Barbecues comes in two varieties: horhog and boodog. Both are traditional Mongolian meat dishes that have a thousands years history and reflect the nomadic lifestyle. 

 


Horhog

Horhog is a traditional Mongolian meat dish, which is very popular in camping and outdoor activities. It is not a dish for two. It should be made at least for 5 people. Horhog cooking is a lot of fun. It entails the spirit of togetherness and sets the beginnings of friendship. The cooking process is simple at first glance, however, it requires practice and intuition. Meat cut in large chunks is cooked with hot stones in a tightly closed aluminum can until it forms a hearty stew. When the cooking is done, the stones are taken out first and given to all horhog eaters. While still hot and greasy, stones should be rolled between palms or held with fingers. Rolling or holding stones with hands is supposed to be good for health because Mongolians believe that the heat and grease from just cooked meat eliminates fatigue and boosts stamina. 

Ingredients (10 servings):
1 half medium sheep
Water
Potatoes (optional)
Carrots (optional)
Yellow turnips (optional)
Bell pepper (optional)
Garlic sprouts (optional)

Seasonings:
Salt
Pepper (optional)
Onion (optional)
Garlic (optional)
Spices (optional)

Cooking gear:
20-liter aluminum can
20-25 medium-sized smooth stones (10 sm x 10 sm)
Firewood

Cooking time:
Approximately 2.5 hours

First heat stones on firewood on open fire. It is important to select the right stones, as not all stones are good for cooking horhog. Stones must be river stones that are smoothly shaped and medium sized. Stones must be thoroughly heated until almost red. If heated correctly, stones usually do not retain any smoke and have a clean surface. 

While stones are heated, prepare meat for cooking. Cut meat in large pieces with bones. If you are cooking a more western-oriented horhog, prepare also vegetables. Wash and peel potatoes, carrots, turnips and onions. Some people add also garlic sprouts. 

Pour 4 liters of water (cold or warm) in a 20-liter aluminum can. The amount of water depends on how much bouillon you would like to have in your horhog. 

Put seasonings in water. Then start putting meat layering it with hot stones. If you are cooking together vegetables, put them always on top. 


Close can tightly and leave the meat to cook for an hour and a half. The meat is supposed to cook on its own purely by the heat of hot stones. However, it sometimes needs additional heating, which you can provide by putting the can on slow open fire. Extra heating may be required due to several reasons. The meat may not be properly layered with hot stones or the number of stones may not be enough for the amount of meat being cooked. 

When the cooking is done, carefully open the can and let the vapors out. First, pull out the stones and pile them aside. Meat and bouillon are usually served separately. 

 


Boodog

Boodog is also a traditional Mongolian meat dish. It is usually made of borlon, a 2-year old goat, cooked with hot stones put inside of it. Therefore, boodog is a group meal, which is very popular in camping and outdoor activities. It is usually for at least 5-6 servings. Boodog cooking also involves a lot of fun and friendship; however, it requires far more artistry and practice than horhog cooking. A goat is filled with preheated hot stones and is tightly sealed. The skin is usually left on. The meat is cooked from inside by hot stones. Simultaneously, the meat is heated from outside with a gas burner to remove hair and roast the meat. This process must be handled with care and expertise. The temperature of stones and the amount of heat from outside must be well balanced and regulated. Otherwise, a lot of pressurized vapor will accumulate inside the meat and the whole package may blow up. When the cooking is done, the stones are taken out first and given to all boodog eaters. While still hot and greasy, stones should be rolled between palms or held with fingers to eliminate fatigue and boost stamina. A hearty stew is usually formed inside the goat. It is separated from the meat and put in a pot. 

The ingredients for boodog are the same as for horhog. Usually, no vegetables are cooked together with meat. 

 


Marmot Boodog

With the opening of a marmot-hunting season, Marmot Boodog becomes a very popular and fun outdoor activity for Mongolians, especially men. Marmot hunting and boodog cooking is a prerogative of men. A freshly killed marmot is separated from intestines and cleaned. Then, a prepared marmot is filled with preheated hot stones and tightly sealed. The marmot meat is cooked by the heat of stones from inside. Additional heating is provided by open fire or gas burner. The same amount of precaution as described above must be used for handling the marmot cooking process. When done, the marmot meat is very tender and tastes like wild duck according to some foreigners. 

Ingredients (5 servings):
1 medium marmot
Salt

Cooking gear:
From small to medium sized smooth stones 
Firewood

Cooking time:
Approximately 1.5 hours

Clean the marmot, separate the intestines and slightly remove hair from the skin. Rub the inside with salt, fill up with hot stones and seal tightly. Additionally, roast the marmot on slow open fire or with a gas burner. Usually, Mongolians do not use seasonings in order to keep the specific taste of marmot meat. When the cooking is done, the stones are pulled out, rolled in hands, the meat is cut into pieces and served hot.

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Hushuur

 

Ingredients:

Meat filling 
Minced beef or mutton
Medium onion
Salt 
Ground pepper (optional)
Garlic (optional)
Chopped herbs (optional) 
5-spices (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Lukewarm water

Preparation and cooking time: 
Approximately 30 minutes


For the dough
Dissolve a pinch of salt in lukewarm water, mix in flour and knead into smooth soft dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and cut into pieces (the size depends on whether you like small, medium and large hushuur). Roll the pieces into balls and leave them rest in a bowl. Sprinkle with flour to avoid from sticking together. The balls will be then rolled out into circles that will be folded in half to enclose the filling in a semi-circle or canoe shape. 

For the meat filling 
Mince beef or mutton. You can certainly use a Moulinex for this purpose; however, hushuur will taste better if you do the mincing by hand using a sharp knife. Combine the meat in a bowl with minced onion, crushed garlic (optional), herbs (optional) and other seasonings. 

The next stage is forming hushuur. Roll out the dough ball into circles. Be careful and do not make the circles too thin. Otherwise, hushuur will crack during frying letting the meat juices out into hot oil and the frying process will turn into a nightmare. Put the meat filling on one side of the circle, fold in half and cover the filling with the other side. Then, start sealing the edges firmly. Just before sealing the hushuur completely, leave a small hole and press the hushuur to make it flat and let the air out. This touch is supposed to prevent hushuur from cracking during frying. 

When forming is complete, fry hushuur uncoated in deep fat. Traditionally, hushuur have been fried in bouillon fat remained from cooking meat. Nowadays, Mongolians use any vegetable oil from a nearby supermarket. 

Fried hushuur must be served hot. Some people like to cover them for some time to make them soft. If you prefer crispy hushuur, do not cover and serve immediately after frying. 

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  Buuz

 


buuz.jpg (47937 octets)

 

Buuz is a different shaped and steamed variety of hushuur. The ingredients and the forming process are almost the same as described above for hushuur. 

Ingredients:

Meat filling 
Minced beef or mutton
Medium onion
Salt 
Ground pepper (optional)
Garlic (optional)
Chopped herbs (optional) 
5-spices (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Lukewarm water

Cooking time: 
Approximately 1 hour

For the dough
Dissolve a pinch of salt in lukewarm water, mix in flour and knead into smooth soft dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and cut into small pieces (the size depends on whether you like small or medium buuz). Roll the pieces into balls and leave them rest in a bowl. Sprinkle with flour to avoid from sticking together. 

For the meat filling 
Mince beef or mutton. You can certainly use a Moulinex for this purpose; however, buuz will taste better if you do the mincing by hand using a sharp knife. Combine the meat in a bowl with minced onion, crushed garlic (optional), herbs (optional) and other seasonings. Add some water to make the filling juicy.

The next stage is forming buuz. Roll out the dough ball into circles by leaving the center thicker than the edges. Put the meat filling in the center of the circle and start sealing the edges with your fingers. Sealing requires agility and skillfulness from your fingers. Each Mongolian family has its own style of sealing such as flower-like, canoe-shape or star-type. 

 

Filling and closing buuz

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Buuz can have a round shape with an open hole in the center or can be closed like a more roundish version of hushuur. However, open buuz will become more juicy and tastier. 

When forming is complete, put buuz in a steamer and steam for 15-20 minutes. Steamed buuz must be served hot. 

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  Mantuun buuz

 

 

Mantuun buuz is a slightly different variety of buuz. The ingredients and the forming process are almost the same as described above for buuz except for the dough. 

Ingredients:

Meat filling 
Minced beef or mutton
Medium onion
Salt 
Ground pepper (optional)
Garlic (optional)
Chopped herbs (optional) 
5-spices (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Lukewarm water
Yeast

Cooking time: 
Approximately 1.5 hour

For the dough
Dissolve a pinch of salt and yeast in lukewarm water, mix in flour and knead into smooth soft dough. Leave the dough to rest and double in size. Knead again and cut into small pieces (the size depends on whether you like small or medium mantuun buuz). Roll the pieces into balls and leave them rest in a bowl. Sprinkle with flour to avoid from sticking together. 

For the meat filling 
Mince beef or mutton. You can certainly use a Moulinex for this purpose; however, mantuun buuz will taste better if you do the mincing by hand using a sharp knife. Combine the meat in a bowl with minced onion, crushed garlic (optional), herbs (optional) and other seasonings. Add some water to make the filling juicy.

The next stage is forming mantuun buuz. Roll out the dough ball into circles by leaving the center thicker than the edges. Put the meat filling in the center of the circle and start sealing the edges with your fingers. With mantuun buuz, sealing is much less sophisticated because the sealing becomes almost unnoticeable when the dough rises during steaming. Mantuun buuz can have a round shape with an open hole in the center or can be closed like a more roundish version of hushuur. However, open mantuun buuz will become more juicy and tastier. 

When forming is complete, put mantuun buuz in a steamer and steam for 15-20 minutes. Steamed mantuun buuz must be served hot.
      

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  Bansh
 


Bansh looks like a miniature buuz that is sealed tightly without any holes and is boiled in water with a pinch of salt instead of being steamed. Bansh can be served as a separate dish or in a bouillon, soup or milk tea. 

Ingredients:

Meat filling 
Minced beef or mutton
Medium onion
Salt 
Ground pepper (optional)
Garlic (optional)
Chopped herbs (optional) 
5-spices (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Lukewarm water

Cooking time: 
Approximately 1 hour

For the dough
Dissolve a pinch of salt in lukewarm water, mix in flour and knead into smooth soft dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and roll out. Cut out small round circles using a glass with sharp edges. 

For the meat filling 
Mince beef or mutton. You can certainly use a Moulinex for this purpose; however, buuz will taste better if you do the mincing by hand using a sharp knife. Combine the meat in a bowl with minced onion, crushed garlic (optional), herbs (optional) and other seasonings. Add some water to make the filling juicy.

The next stage is forming bansh. Put the meat filling in the center of the circle and seal the edges tightly with your fingers. When forming is complete, put bansh in boiling water, add a pinch of salt and cook for about 7-10 minutes or until bansh starts floating on the surface. Boiled bansh must be served hot.

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  Milk tea with bansh
 


Pour cold water in a kettle, add a pinch of salt, crushed green tea and bring to boil. Add milk and bring to boil again. You can add milk with the tea and boil everything together. Pour the milk tea through a strainer (to separate from tea pieces) into a large cooking pot. Add bansh and cook for about 7-10 minutes or until bansh starts floating on the surface. Bansh is served hot in milk tea.

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  Boortsog
 


Boortsog is a traditional Mongolian biscuit of various shapes deep-fried in hot oil. Bouillon fat that remains from cooking meat is traditionally used for the frying purpose. It gives boortsog a specific bouillon aroma that Mongolians like. However, any vegetable oil can be used for frying. 

Ingredients:

Premium wheat flour – 1 kg
A pinch of salt
Sugar – 150 g
Butter – 100 g
Warm boiled water

Cooking time: 
Approximately 2 hours

Dissolve salt, sugar and butter in warm boiled water and blend until the sugar and butter are completely dissolved and a smooth homogenous mixture is formed. Then, mix in flour and knead into smooth soft dough. The kneading process is very important for boortsog and may require sufficient strength and energy. The dough must be kneaded until such a state when no air remains in it. When the dough is cut, the profile must be absolutely smooth and homogenous with no hole or air bubble whatsoever. Reaching such a state will require a series of kneading and leaving the dough to rest. When the dough is ready, roll out until it is about 1-1.5 sm thick. Now, you can use your imagination to cut the dough into different shapes. However, the classic shaping is to cut the dough into stripes of 3-4 sm wide and cut out squares, triangles or any other shapes using a sharp knife. Using the knife, make two little cut-like lines on each piece. This is done in order to let the air out, if any left, as well as to give some decoration to boortsog. Some people cut the dough into rectangles that are 3 sm wide and about 10 sm long, make a long cut in the middle, pull simultaneously the two edges through the cut and twist to the opposite sides. 

Preheat oil, put boortsog in bunches and fry until golden brown. Pull out with the strainer and put on the rack to cool down. 

Boortsog can be eaten as is or with jam, butter, cheese or anything else of your choice. Boortsog can be stored for about a month and is an excellent replacement of bread during long trips. 

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  Guriltai shol 

 


Guriltai shol is a very simple and healthy Mongolian noodle soup made of meat and dough stripes. It is warms you up and is practically irreplaceable in cold winters. If the route to a man’s heart lies through his stomach, then the route to a Mongolian man’s heart will surely lie through a bowl of guriltai shol. 

Ingredients: 

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion
Pepper and other seasonings (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Water

Cooking time: 
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. You can put bones with some meat to make the bouillon heartier. Such bones are removed when the bouillon is ready. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough. 

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and knead into smooth but enough hard dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and roll out thinly. Cut into stripes of 3-4 sm wide, put 3-4 stripes on each other layering with sprinkles of flour to avoid sticking and slice into thin pieces. 

Put the thin dough pieces into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes. Add thinly sliced onion. You may add pepper and other soup seasonings, however, these are not used for the classic Mongolian guriltai shol. 

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  Pyartan

 

 

Pyartan is a variety of guriltai shol. However, the dough pieces are cut into thin rectangles or are randomly torn from the thinly rolled out dough stripes. The cooking process is the same as for guriltai shol.. 

Ingredients: 

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion
Pepper and other seasonings (optional)

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt

Water


Cooking time: 
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. You can put bones with some meat to make the bouillon heartier. Such bones are removed when the bouillon is ready. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough. 

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and knead into smooth but enough hard dough. Leave the dough to rest. Knead again and roll out thinly. Cut into stripes of 2-3 sm wide, put 3-4 stripes on each other layering with sprinkles of flour to avoid sticking and cut out thin rectangles. 

Put the thin dough rectangles into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes. You can also randomly tear pieces from the dough stripes into the bouillon. Add thinly sliced onion

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  Bantan

 


Bantan is a simple Mongolian soup of creamy texture made of meat and dough crumbs. Bantan is a favorite hangover remedy for Mongolians. 

Ingredients: 

Meat (beef or mutton)
Salt
Onion

Dough
Premium wheat flour
A pinch of salt
Water

Cooking time: 
Approximately 30 minutes

Cut the meat into thin small slices, put in cold water, add salt and boil. Usually, Mongolians do not use lean meat because it does not produce a good bouillon. Therefore, leave the fat on and slice it together with meat. While the bouillon is being cooked, prepare the dough. 

Dissolve a pinch of salt in cold water, mix in flour and blend with your fingers into small dough crumbs. Put the crumbs into the boiling bouillon and boil for 4-5 minutes until the soup becomes thick and creamy. You can add thinly sliced onion.

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  Suutei tsai
 


Suutei tsai is a traditional and favorite Mongolian milk tea. Pour cold water in a kettle, add a pinch of salt (salt is optional, some families do not use salt at all), crushed green tea, milk and bring to boil. Pour the milk tea through a strainer (to separate from tea pieces) into a hot pot or directly into bowls. 

Another popular version is milk tea with millet. Clean a handful of millet and rinse with cold water. Preheat butter, put the millet, sprinkle with flour and fry until light golden brown. Put the fried millet into the boiling milk tea and boil for about 4-5 minutes or until the millet becomes mild. 

 

Preparation and offering of tea in a nomadic family

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